David Butorac: "A Most Synoptic Method: Alexander Aphrodisias, John Philoponus and Proclus' Parmenides"

butorac

David Butorac (Fatih University) - `A Most Synoptic Method: Alexander Aphrodisias, John Philoponus and Proclus' Parmenides'. Listen here.

Aristotle's Prior Analytics I 27 is a part of that work has, to put it mildly, not undergone intense scrutiny, whether in antiquity, the middle ages (Latin, Byzantinian or Arabic) and in contempory scholarship. We do possess Alexander Aphrodisias' commentary on it, as well as that of John Philoponus, purportedly based on lectures of Ammonius, who had in turn attended lectures by Proclus on the Analytics. However, there is one other ancient interpretation of this part of the work, which belongs to Proclus. Instead of being in the midst of a commentary on Aristotle, it is, unexpectedly, in the middle of his long commentary on Plato's Parmenides, and more unexpectedly still, Proclus claims that Aristotle copied the dialectical method of the Parmenides. This lecture will focus on the genesis of Proclus' interpretation in Alexander, and then use Philoponus to further undertand how Proclus used a part of Aristotle's Analytics to interpret, of all things, the theological dialectic par excellence.